Dr Martin D. Fried Specializes in the following:

We Consult A – Z

click on the links for more info or videos

- See more at: http://www.healthydays.info/services.html#sthash.eb7niduk.dpuf

Check Out this Medical Video of Nutritional Items

Dr Martin D. Fried’s is a Nutrition Physician Specialist in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Weight issues, celiac, food intolerances, autism, diabetes, osteoporosis, fatigue, anemia, hypertension, heartburn, high cholesterol, and cancer. He also offers healthy tips for eating out, eating on the run, vegetarian diets. He performs body composition analysis and sets up specialized individual programs. He is also an artist, toy train enthusiast and has a tropical fish tank in his office. He also works with Chronic Fatigue syndrome, food allergies, overweight, healthy eating- See the video below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5Gwq_mHHwo

Iron Problems seen in an office in Monmouth, NJ by a Nutrition Physician

A teenage girl came to see me- for fatigue and a food eating disorder. I ordered an iron profile and learned that she had an elevated iron in her blood. Her family history is such that they have a condition called hemochromatosis, where Iron may be deposited in excess in the liver and other organs of the body. At this time, she is not having symptoms related to this possible underlying condition, however, I did order a DNA test of her genes to see if she contains the gene for this condition. She was taken off iron supplementation for menses, since her iron is above normal in the blood- indicating she doesn’t need supplemental iron. She was also taken off a multivitamin containing iron- since she didn’t need the excess iron. 

We will follow her iron levels and her red blood cell counts and liver enzymes to make sure she doesn’t continue to have an overload of iron in her blood or certain tissues- such as her liver. 

How many calories do I need?

Intake of Calories, fruits, vegetables and grains recommended by age

This in a link from the American Academy of Pediatrics showing the energy requirements and the amounts of fruits vegetables, grains and protein foods they recommend based on age and calories you need. The take into account if you are sedentary or active.

 

 

Boost your metabolism

 

Boost up your metabolism

1) Drink before you eat- drinking two glasses of water before every meals helped dieters lose an average of 15 pounds over three months. Quick hydration breaks also boosts your metabolism

Try to consume half your body weight in ounces a day.

2) eat a mini meal- Its 3 pm and your stomach is rumbling- If you wait till dinnertime to eat, you may be so starving that you end up overdoing it. Eating small meals raises your metabolism every time you eat. Include a lean protein and a complex carbohydrate such as peanut butter with a fruit, or yogurt with berries

3) Stand up when your phone rings- it could lead to doubling the amount of calories your body will burn.

4) Take one bite at a time- It takes 20 minutes before your stomach hormones tell your brain you are full and to stop eating. When you engulf a burger and fries, you don’t five enough time to relay the message to your brain.

5) Limiting meal time distractions such as TV and Cell phone helps control portions because you are more aware of what you are eating.

Haribo Gummy bears- what is in them

Sugar free haribo gummy bears- is sugarless/sugar free with ingredients that can causes intestinal distress if taken in excess.

The ingredient is Maltitol- a sugar alcohol that is almost as sweet as table sugar but half the calories. Our bodies dont digest it, so it can ferment in the gut causing bloating, loose stools, and tummy rumbling.

Though these products are considered safe to eat, adults who consume these sugar alcohols in large quantities saw an increase in the frequency of bowel movements and they were watery.

Gluten free diet, Celiac, Autism, Gluten sensitivity etc

A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye).
A gluten-free diet is used to treat celiac disease. Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications.
Initially, following a gluten-free diet may be frustrating. But with time, patience and creativity, you’ll find there are many foods that you already eat that are gluten-free and you will find substitutes for gluten-containing foods that you can enjoy.
Purpose
The gluten-free diet is a treatment for celiac disease.
Diet details
Switching to a gluten-free diet is a big change and, like anything new, it takes some getting used to. You may initially feel deprived by the diet’s restrictions. However, try to stay positive and focus on all the foods you can eat. You may also be pleasantly surprised to realize how many gluten-free products, such as bread and pasta, are now available. Many specialty grocery stores sell gluten-free foods. If you can’t find them in your area, check with a celiac support group or go online.
If you’re just starting with a gluten-free diet, it’s a good idea to consult a dietitian who can answer your questions and offer advice about how to avoid gluten while still eating a healthy, balanced diet.
Allowed foods Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free:
Beans, seeds, nuts in their natural, unprocessed form
Fresh eggs
Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated)
Fruits and vegetables
Most dairy products
It’s important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet:
Amaranth
Arrowroot
Buckwheat
Corn and cornmeal
Flax
Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean)
Hominy (corn)
Millet
Quinoa
Rice
Sorghum
Soy
Tapioca
Teff
Always avoid Avoid all food and drinks containing:
Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
Rye
Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
Wheat
Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are other wheat products to avoid:
Bulgur
Durum flour
Farina
Graham flour
Kamut
Semolina
Spelt
Avoid unless labeled ‘gluten-free’ In general, avoid the following foods unless they’re labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain:
Beer
Breads
Cakes and pies
Candies
Cereals
Cookies and crackers
Croutons
French fries
Gravies
Imitation meat or seafood
Matzo
Pastas
Processed luncheon meats
Salad dressings
Sauces, including soy sauce
Seasoned rice mixes
Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
Self-basting poultry
Soups and soup bases
Vegetables in sauce
Certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free.
You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include:
Food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others
Medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent
Play dough
Watch for cross-contamination Cross-contamination occurs when gluten-free foods come into contact with foods that contain gluten. It can happen during the manufacturing process, for example, if the same equipment is used to make a variety of products. Some food labels include a “may contain” statement if this is the case. But be aware that this type of statement is voluntary. You still need to check the actual ingredient list. If you’re not sure whether a food contains gluten, don’t buy it or check with the manufacturer first to ask what it contains.
Cross-contamination can also occur at home if foods are prepared on common surfaces or with utensils that weren’t thoroughly cleaned after being used to prepare gluten-containing foods. Using a common toaster for gluten-free bread and regular bread is a major source of contamination, for example. Consider what steps you need to take to prevent cross-contamination at home, school or work.
Results
People with celiac disease who eat a gluten-free diet experience fewer symptoms and complications of the disease. People with celiac disease must eat a strictly gluten-free diet and must remain on the diet for the remainder of their lives.
In some severe cases, a gluten-free diet alone can’t stop the symptoms and complications of celiac disease. In these cases, doctors might prescribe medications to suppress the immune system.
Risks
Not getting enough vitamins People who follow a gluten-free diet may have low levels of certain vitamins and nutrients in their diets. Many grains are enriched with vitamins. Avoiding grains with a gluten-free diet may mean eating fewer of these enriched products. Ask your dietitian to review your diet to see that you’re getting enough of these key nutrients:
Iron
Calcium
Fiber
Thiamin
Riboflavin
Niacin
Folate
Not sticking to the gluten-free diet If you accidentally eat a product that contains gluten, you may experience abdominal pain and diarrhea. Some people experience no signs or symptoms after eating gluten, but this doesn’t mean it’s not damaging their small intestines. Even trace amounts of gluten in your diet may be damaging, whether or not they cause signs or symptoms.