Screen time for TV, computers, smartphones and Obesity

Screen time and obesity

There is a definite relation between screen time on TV and obesity as well as between videos, computers and obesity. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests no more than two hours a day of screen time. 

Media is everywhere. TV, Internet, computer and video games all vie for our children’s attention. Information on this page can help parents understand the impact media has in our children’s lives, while offering tips on managing time spent with various media. The AAP has recommendations for parents and pediatricians.

Today’s children are spending an average of seven hours a day on entertainment media, including televisions, computers, phones and other electronic devices. To help kids make wise media choices, parents should monitor their media diet. Parents can make use of established ratings systems for shows, movies and games to avoid inappropriate content, such as violence, explicit sexual content or glorified tobacco and alcohol use.

Studies have shown that excessive media use can lead to attention problems, school difficulties, sleep and eating disorders, and obesity. In addition, the Internet and cell phones can provide platforms for illicit and risky behaviors.

By limiting screen time and offering educational media and non-electronic formats such as books, newspapers and board games, and watching television with their children, parents can help guide their children’s media experience. Putting questionable content into context and teaching kids about advertising contributes to their media literacy.

The AAP recommends that parents establish “screen-free” zones at home by making sure there are no televisions, computers or video games in children’s bedrooms, and by turning off the TV during dinner. Children and teens should engage with entertainment media for no more than one or two hours per day, and that should be high-quality content. It is important for kids to spend time on outdoor play, reading, hobbies, and using their imaginations in free play.

Television and other entertainment media should be avoided for infants and children under age 2. A child’s brain develops rapidly during these first years, and young children learn best by interacting with people, not screens.

- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/aap-press-room-media-center/Pages/Media-Kit-Children-and-Media.aspx

 

Celiac = What to eat

http://www.thedoctorsvideos.com/video/8697/Celiac-Disease–Diet

If you have celiac or have had it for a while, consider that one autoimmune disease ( such as celiac) can cause another one to occur- such as diabetes, crohn’s, and thyroid issues. If you are following a gluten free diet and not improving- consider other autoimmune conditions.

 

Whats in a NAME?

Tom was invited to his friend’s house for dinner. He found that his buddy called his wife every cute name in the book: honey, darling, sweetheart, pumpkin, and baby.

When she was in the kitchen, he leaned over to his friend and said, “I think it’s nice you still call your wife all those pet names.” “To tell you the truth,” his friend said, “I forgot her name abut three years ago.”

Constipation and fiber and fluids

Constipation is one of the most common intestinal problems in children and adults. It is a symptom that signals something is wrong. It is not a disease. Most constipation is not caused by a serious medical disease.

The cause of most constipation has no sign of injury, infection or blood abnormality to explain the very real symptoms. Children need help from their parents and sometimes from a health care professional, to prevent or manage constipation.

Constipation can be defined as the passage of painful stools or a reduction in the frequency of stools. An important feature is pain or difficulty in passing stool, regardless of frequency. The experience of pain when going to the bathroom can lead to avoidance of having a bowel movement.
It is not correct to assume that a bowel movement every day is normal. There really is no right number of bowel movements. In general, 2 or less normal bowel movements a week may be a sign of constipation.

Constipation is generally caused by a change in diet and fluid intake, or by avoidance of bowel movements because of pain such as anal irritation or small tears in the skin or rashes. Other factors such as change in daily routine, stressful events or postponing using the toilet when the urge to have a bowel movement can play a role in a painful bowel movement.

There are a number of ways to help avoid constipation- pay attention to what you eat and drink and getting exercise.

Certain foods can contribute to constipation and should be avoided such as: High fat foods, high sugar foods, processed foods such as instant mashed potatoes, macaroni and cheese. Food that have little or no fiber such as ice cream, milk, dairy, cheese and snacks like chips and pizza can be a contributing factor in constipation.

Eat more fiber. Add fiber to the diet. Fiber helps form soft, bulky stool. It is found in many fruits, whole grains, and vegetables. Be sure to add fiber a little at a time, so the body can get used to it.

Drink more liquids- water is best, sugar drinks are the worst. Drinking sugar drinks, without fiber, fills your body with calories without fiber.

Exercising helps the digestive system to stay active and healthy. A walk for 20 minutes a day can help or you can break it up into two ten minute sessions.
It is important to allow enough time to have a bowel movement and not to ignore the urge to have a bowel movement. Waiting only makes constipation worse.
– See more at

Dr Martin D. Fried Specializes in the following:

We Consult A – Z

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Check Out this Medical Video of Nutritional Items

Dr Martin D. Fried’s is a Nutrition Physician Specialist in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Weight issues, celiac, food intolerances, autism, diabetes, osteoporosis, fatigue, anemia, hypertension, heartburn, high cholesterol, and cancer. He also offers healthy tips for eating out, eating on the run, vegetarian diets. He performs body composition analysis and sets up specialized individual programs. He is also an artist, toy train enthusiast and has a tropical fish tank in his office. He also works with Chronic Fatigue syndrome, food allergies, overweight, healthy eating- See the video below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5Gwq_mHHwo

Iron Problems seen in an office in Monmouth, NJ by a Nutrition Physician

A teenage girl came to see me- for fatigue and a food eating disorder. I ordered an iron profile and learned that she had an elevated iron in her blood. Her family history is such that they have a condition called hemochromatosis, where Iron may be deposited in excess in the liver and other organs of the body. At this time, she is not having symptoms related to this possible underlying condition, however, I did order a DNA test of her genes to see if she contains the gene for this condition. She was taken off iron supplementation for menses, since her iron is above normal in the blood- indicating she doesn’t need supplemental iron. She was also taken off a multivitamin containing iron- since she didn’t need the excess iron. 

We will follow her iron levels and her red blood cell counts and liver enzymes to make sure she doesn’t continue to have an overload of iron in her blood or certain tissues- such as her liver.