Dr martin Fried Genetic testing

Dr martin Fried’s genetic testing can help treat the following conditions

autoimmune diseases-Crohn’s Colitis, celiac, mutliple sclerosis, hashimoto’s, rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, lupus, collagen vascular disease, and diabetes

MTHFR- folate metabolisms problems leading to depression, anxiety, panic attacks, attention defecit, memory problems, PTSD, IBS, irritable bowel, bipolar, schizophrenia, and many other psychiatric conditions such as binge eating, anorexia, bulimia, food eating concerns. methyltetrahydrofolate supplementation is addressed

Infections as Lyme. Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Rickettsia, Babesia, and other immune system conditions.

Detoxification of drugs, including prozac, effexor, lexapro, clonepin, xanax, Detoxification of heavy metals and mold, glutathione and cytochrome P450 is addressed as well as transulfuration pathways, CBS, pesticides

Overweight, Obesity, nutritional conditions such as food allelrgies, histamine release, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, leaky gut, stretch marks, GERD, gastroesophageal reflux

Vitamins and mineral excess and deficiencies such as folate, B12, B6, biotin, selenium, zinc, calcium and vitamin D. Supplementation is also addressed

Gut issues such as bloating, diarrhea, constipation, gastroparesis, yeast overgrowth, fungal conditions, parasites,

Allergies and immunological conditions such as eosinophilic gastroenteritis, food allergies, IgA deficiency, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Milk Protein Allergies

Brain Chemistry- Serotonin, Dopamine, Norepinephrine, GABA, are evaluated along with Monoamine oxidase, MAO, Serotonin receptors and serotonin carrier proteins, SSRI, lithium, prozac, effexor, lexapro and other medications can be determined if they are appropriate for you based on DNA testing.

Heart disease, blood clots, homocysteine levels are measured

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lactose intolerance and Probiotics

For people who are lactose intolerant and or concerned about gut health try DAIRY CARE

It can be found in health food stores and online

It lines the intestines with acidophilus which helps with the absorption of undigested sugar that may cause gas, bloating and diarrhea.

It increases the absorption of minerals such as calcium and phosphorus which helps prevent osteoporosis

It eliminates the need to buy lactose free products if you take two capsules in the morning-daily

It also increases the use of niacin and folate, absorption of iron from the intestines,

THE CAPSULES are enteric coated and don’t get destroyed by stomach acid

 

 

 

 

Changes to Nutrition Labels Reported

(CNN) — Choosing healthier foods at the grocery store may soon be a little easier.

The Food and Drug Administration is proposing several changes to the nutrition labels you see on packaged foods and beverages. If approved, the new labels would place a bigger emphasis on total calories, added sugars and certain nutrients, such as Vitamin D and potassium.

The FDA is also proposing changes to serving size requirements in an effort to more accurately reflect what people usually eat or drink. For example, if you buy a 20-ounce soda, you’re probably not going to stop drinking at the 8-ounce mark. The new rules would require that entire soda bottle to be one serving size — making calorie counting simpler.

This is the first overhaul for nutrition labels since the FDA began requiring them more than 20 years ago. There has been a shift in shoppers’ priorities as nutrition is better understood and people learn what they should watch for on a label, administration officials said.

“You as a parent and a consumer should be able to walk into your local grocery store, pick up an item off the shelf, and be able to tell whether it’s good for your family,” first lady Michelle Obama said in a press release. “So this is a big deal, and it’s going to make a big difference for families all across this country.”

 

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The proposed labels would remove the “calories from fat” line you currently see on labels, focusing instead on total calories found in each serving. Nutritionists have come to understand that the type of fat you’re eating matters more than the calories from fat. As such, the breakdown of total fat vs. saturated and trans fat would remain.

Put down that doughnut: FDA takes on trans fat

The proposed labels would also note how much added sugar is in a product. Right now, it’s hard to know what is naturally occurring sugar and what has been added by the manufacturer.

“Now when Americans pull a product from the supermarket shelf, they will have a clear idea of how much sugar that product really contains,” American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown said.

Chemically, added sugar is the same, but studies show many Americans eat more sugar than they realize. TheAmerican Heart Association recommends you limit added sugar to no more than half your daily discretionary calories. That means for American men, about 150 calories a day, or nine teaspoons. For women it’s a smaller amount — no more than 100 calories per day from added sugar, or about six teaspoons of sugar.

The FDA also plans to update the daily values for certain nutrients such as sodium, dietary fiber and Vitamin D. For instance, the daily limit for sodium was 2,400 milligrams. If the new rules take effect, the daily value will be 2,300 milligrams, administration officials said.

Food and beverage companies would also be required to declare the amount of Vitamin D and potassium in a product, as well as calcium and iron. Research shows Americans tend not to consume enough Vitamin D for good bone health. And potassium is essential in keeping your blood pressure in check.

Vegetarian diet could help lower your blood pressure

Administration officials said about 17% of current serving size requirements will be changing, and the FDA is adding 25 categories for products that weren’t commonly around 20 years ago (think pot stickers, sesame oil and sun-dried tomatoes).

Most of the required serving sizes will be going up; no one eats just half a cup of ice cream, for instance. Others, like yogurt, will be going down.

“This will help people better understand how many calories they actually consume, especially if they plan to eat all the food in a container or package,” Brown said.

While the American Heart Association and advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest commended the FDA’s changes, they noted that there was more to do.

Both organizations said the FDA’s sodium recommendation was still too high. Brown said the association will continue to recommend sodium intake be limited to 1,500 milligrams a day.

CSPI said it will also request that the FDA include a daily value of 25 grams for added sugars. “Thus, the Nutrition Facts label for a 16.9-ounce bottle of soda would indicate that its 58 grams of added sugars represents 230 percent of the DV,” the group said in an e-mail.

With this announcement, the FDA has opened a 90-day comment period, during which experts and members of the public can provide input on the proposed rules. The FDA will then issue a final rule. Officials said they hope to complete the process this year.

Manufacturing companies will then have two years to implement the changes.

Nutrition labels have remained pretty much the same for decades. It wasn’t until the late 1960s that most food labels listed any nutrition information.

At the time, labels with calorie or sodium counts were mainly used on products the FDA considered to have “special dietary uses,” for people with high blood pressure who were watching sodium, for instance.

Most people were making meals at home then, so there wasn’t a huge demand for this information. That changed as more people started eating processed foods.

Noticing the trend, the White House pulled together a conference of nutritionists and food manufacturers in 1969. Nutrition labeling was voluntary at first. It wasn’t until 1990 that the FDA required nutrition labels for most prepared and packaged foods. Labels for raw produce and fish remain voluntary.

More Americans today are interested in what’s on these nutrition labels, research shows.

A USDA study released last month showed 42% of working-age adults between 29 and 68 looked at these labels most or all of the time when shopping. Some 57% of Americans older than 68 did as well. That’s up from 2007, when 34% of working-age adults looked at the label, and 51% of Americans older than 68 did.

The increase is good news as the United States struggles with an obesity epidemic. Some studies have shown that people who read labels eat healthier. More than a third of all Americans are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Link

Dr Fried’s Videos

Here is a link to a host of videos on Nutritional and Gastrointestinal conditions such as celiac, diet, nutrition, crohns, Lyme, pet diseases, GERD, diabetes, glycemic load, H. pylori, underweight,

Also included are videos on diarrhea, colitis, milk allergy, Iron, infant formulas, casein and whey proteins

Daily Requirements of vitamins, minerals, Protein, carbohydrates, fat

Nutrient Unit of Measure Daily Values
Total Fat grams (g) 65
  Saturated fatty acids grams (g) 20
Cholesterol milligrams (mg) 300
Sodium milligrams (mg) 2400
Potassium milligrams (mg) 3500
Total carbohydrate grams (g) 300
  Fiber grams (g) 25
Protein grams (g) 50
Nutrient Unit of Measure Daily Values
Vitamin A International Unit (IU) 5000
Vitamin C milligrams (mg) 60
Calcium milligrams (mg) 1000
Iron milligrams (mg) 18
Vitamin D International Unit (IU) 400
Vitamin E International Unit (IU) 30
Vitamin K micrograms (µg) 80
Thiamin milligrams (mg) 1.5
Riboflavin milligrams (mg) 1.7
Niacin milligrams (mg) 20
Vitamin B6 milligrams (mg) 2.0
Folate micrograms (µg) 400
Vitamin B12 micrograms (µg) 6.0
Biotin micrograms (µg) 300
Pantothenic acid milligrams (mg) 10
Phosphorus milligrams (mg) 1000
Iodine micrograms (µg) 150
Magnesium milligrams (mg) 400
Zinc milligrams (mg) 15
Selenium micrograms (µg) 70
Copper milligrams (mg) 2.0
Manganese milligrams (mg) 2.0
Chromium micrograms (µg) 120
Molybdenum micrograms (µg) 75
Chloride milligrams (mg) 3400

Weight loss tips

Weight Loss Tips

Monitor Portion  Size– As the fat content of many foods have gone down, the portion  sizes have been growing steadily larger without anyone seeming to noticed.  Todays  supersized popcorn or French  fries would have fed three to four hungry kids 20 years ago.

Learn what a  portion size is and use this portion size:                             
1 portion of pasta or whole grains is  ½ cup or size of a half a baseball or a half  of a cup                             
Waffle  portion is  the size of a CD                             
3 ounces of meat is equal to a deck of cards                             
Peanut butter- 2 tablespoons, or size of a golf ball                             
Rice- the size of a light bulb is 2 oz                             
6 ounces of fish is equal to the size of a check book                             
A portion of cheese is one slice or two small dice cubes.

Add fiber to  meals– Fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains add fiber to meals,  fill you up and are low in calories- Fresh fruits and vegetables when bought in  season are less expensive than you think.   Also, cookies and chips do not have the nutritional value of fresh  fruits and vegetables, so while they may be cheaper, you are getting less for  your money.

Drink water  instead of soft drinks– Sports drinks, fruit drinks, and even 100% real  fruit juice, have little nutritional value and are high in calories. A 8 ounce  serving can have 150 calories, which would be equal to two fresh fruits.

Variety,  moderation and balance– If you say that your child only eats fries as  his vegetable, try  a variety of  vegetables, even if they push it away. Sometimes it will take up to 10 tries  for a child to develop a taste for a healthy fresh fruit or vegetable. You can  have the child help you prepare the meal and add a vegetable to a pasta dish  you are preparing.  When eating out-  expose them to the salad bar and to vegetables they might not eat at home- so  they are exposed to a variety of foods.                              Parents are the role model, if the child sees a parent  eating vegetables,  he is more likely to  try them. Have your child get used to the idea that vegetables are a part of every  lunch and dinner. Your child will need to have at least one fruit and vegetable  at each meal to meet the required 5-7 servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

Scale back on  fast foods– a person can spend a day’s calories on a single fast food  meal. One double burger with a supersized fries and large soda is 1400 calories  and 50 grams of fat.

As long as a person eats 1200 calories or more a day,  including five servings of fruits and vegetables, supplements should not be  necessary.                               If concerned about calcium, zinc, iron, and folic acid-  see your physician for a nutritional analysis of your diet.

                         Become physically active- Activity needs to become a  priority. Exercise wins out over video games and TV, or surfing the web. A 20  minute walk is a good place to start.   Physical activity promotes motor and mental development and  coordination.  Physical activity can  include straightening out the room or helping with chores around the house.

Vegetarian sources of Iron

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Vegetarian sources of Iron

Here are additional high iron sources from vegetables and legumes. They include one potato, one stalk of broccoli, 1/2 cup of cooked beans or chickpeas, soybeans, quinoa ( 4oz), lentils and cooked spinach ( 1/2 cup) There are many other sources than listed here and shown in the picture. These sources should be taken with vitamin C to increase the absorption of iron. Tea and coffee should be avoided at the time of intake, since they bind iron and may decrease its absorption. Each of the above serving provides 4-8 mg of Iron.