Check Out this Medical Video of Nutritional Items

Dr Martin D. Fried’s is a Nutrition Physician Specialist in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Weight issues, celiac, food intolerances, autism, diabetes, osteoporosis, fatigue, anemia, hypertension, heartburn, high cholesterol, and cancer. He also offers healthy tips for eating out, eating on the run, vegetarian diets. He performs body composition analysis and sets up specialized individual programs. He is also an artist, toy train enthusiast and has a tropical fish tank in his office. He also works with Chronic Fatigue syndrome, food allergies, overweight, healthy eating- See the video below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5Gwq_mHHwo

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Boost your metabolism

 

Boost up your metabolism

1) Drink before you eat- drinking two glasses of water before every meals helped dieters lose an average of 15 pounds over three months. Quick hydration breaks also boosts your metabolism

Try to consume half your body weight in ounces a day.

2) eat a mini meal- Its 3 pm and your stomach is rumbling- If you wait till dinnertime to eat, you may be so starving that you end up overdoing it. Eating small meals raises your metabolism every time you eat. Include a lean protein and a complex carbohydrate such as peanut butter with a fruit, or yogurt with berries

3) Stand up when your phone rings- it could lead to doubling the amount of calories your body will burn.

4) Take one bite at a time- It takes 20 minutes before your stomach hormones tell your brain you are full and to stop eating. When you engulf a burger and fries, you don’t five enough time to relay the message to your brain.

5) Limiting meal time distractions such as TV and Cell phone helps control portions because you are more aware of what you are eating.

Hypoglycemia- Low blood sugar- as a cause of Fatigue

What is known as the hypoglycemic diet should really be called the “Natural Diet”.
This is the diet that humans have consumed over the millions of years to which our digestive system has adapted. It is said to provide the right combination of amino acid, vitamins and minerals from the food we eat.
The best plan is to ask yourself what diet your ancestors ate and think of your grand-parents. Think of what people ate in the 19th century without the sugar.

Whatever diet you finish up with, you must choose a diet that you enjoy.
In brief the nutritional treatment of the hypoglycemic condition consists of:

1) Avoidance of sugar, refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, white rice, cakes and sugary drinks, candy bars, colas, cookies, ice cream

2) High protein + complex carbohydrates snacks every three to four hours or sooner, to provide a slow release of glucose, and to prevent the hypoglycemic dip. A high protein breakfast must be considered the most important meal of the day. ”High-protein foods, such as fish, eggs, chicken, and beef, contain all twenty-two, including the nine amino acids that are considered essential for humans.” Eat plenty of green vegetables and fruits and the more varied the diet the better it is.

3) Fiber in your diet slows down the absorption of glucose (thereby avoiding blood sugar peaks and the release of stress hormones) Include fresh vegetables in your diet because they are high in fiber and low in sugar.

4) A diet low in processed sugars aims at normalizing blood sugar levels, thereby normalizing stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol, that are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of mood-swings, depression, anxiety, phobias, alcoholism and drug-addiction.
Such a pattern of eating needs to be adjusted to the individual needs and nutritional biochemistry. It needs to take into account the influence of allergies.
Furthermore, it should be realized that the beneficial effects this eating plan may take considerable time. Normally, the effects are noticeable within three months. If after this time symptoms still persist, it is time to seek the help of a clinical nutritionist or nutritional doctor for further testing, diagnosis and treatment.

ASK YOURSELF, “IS WHAT I AM EATING NATURE MADE OR MAN MADE?”
Nature-made food consists of complex carbohydrates and proteins, the kind of food we were meant to eat.
Try to introduce the nature made foods slowly and gradually.

When introducing a new diet we must always consider possible allergies.
Many hypoglycemics have hidden allergies, that is after having been on the hypoglycemic diet for some time they discover that they are allergic to certain food items. These were there all the time, but were masked by hypoglycemic symptoms.

Finding your Allergies.
The Hypoglycemic Diet should not be regarded as a ‘quick fix diet’. It takes time for the body to adjust to a different nutritional lifestyle. Time is needed to absorb and metabolize nutrients to be converted to neurotransmitters, enzymes and coenzymes, and to rebuild receptors for natural neurochemicals.

Lower your cholesterol naturally

If you eat when you’re bored or frustrated, take a walk instead.
If you pick up fast food for lunch every day, pack something healthier from home.
If you’re sitting in front of the television, try munching on carrot sticks instead of potato chips as you watch. Take time and enjoy rather than “devouring” your food. Don’t eat mindlessly.

And look for ways to incorporate more activity into your daily routine, such as using the stairs instead of taking the elevator.
Take stock of what you currently eat and your physical activity level and slowly work in changes.

2. Eat heart-healthy foods

Even if you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt, making a few changes in your diet can reduce cholesterol and improve your heart health.

Choose healthier fats. Saturated fats, found in red meat and dairy products, raise your total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol.

As a general rule, you should get less than 7 percent of your daily calories from saturated fat.

Instead, choose leaner cuts of meat, low-fat dairy and monounsaturated fats — found in olive, peanut and canola oils — for a healthier option.

Eliminate trans fats. Trans fat can be found in fried foods and many commercial baked products, such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes.

But don’t rely on packages that are labeled “trans fat-free.” In the United States, if a food contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving, it can be labeled “trans fat-free.” Even though those amounts seem small, they can add up quickly if you eat a lot of foods that have a small amount of trans fat in them. Instead, read the ingredients list. You can tell if a food has trans fat in it if it contains partially hydrogenated oil.

Limit the cholesterol in your food. Aim for no more than 300 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol a day — less than 200 mg if you have heart disease or diabetes. The most concentrated sources of cholesterol include organ meats, egg yolks and whole milk products.
Use lean cuts of meat, egg substitutes and skim milk instead.

Select whole grains. Various nutrients found in whole grains promote heart health. Choose whole-grain breads, whole-wheat pasta, whole-wheat flour and brown rice.
Stock up on fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are rich in dietary fiber, which can help lower cholesterol. Snack on seasonal fruits. Experiment with veggie-based casseroles, soups and stir-fries. If you prefer dried fruit to fresh fruit, limit yourself to no more than a handful (about an ounce or two). Dried fruit tends to have more calories than does fresh fruit.

Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids can help lower your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Some types of fish — such as salmon, mackerel and herring — are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Other good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include walnuts, almonds and ground flaxseeds.

3. Exercise on most days of the week

Whether you’re overweight or not, exercise can reduce cholesterol. Better yet, moderate physical activity can help raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the “good” cholesterol. With your doctor’s OK, work up to at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. Just be sure that you can keep up the changes you decide to make. Consider:

Taking a brisk daily walk during your lunch hour
Riding your bike to work
Swimming laps
Playing a favorite sport
To stay motivated, find an exercise buddy or join an exercise group. And remember, any activity is helpful. Even taking the stairs instead of the elevator or doing a few situps while watching television can make a difference

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HIDDEN SUGAR SOURCES in foods we eat

Pasta sauces have up to 12 g of sugar in a half a cup of of sauce- That’s the amount of sugar in a chocolate chip cookie

Yogurt can have between 17-33 grams of sugar in 8ounces- read the labels

Instant oatmeal has about 10-15 g of sugar that is not found in oatmeal that is not in individual packages.

Many breakfast cereals have 10-20 grams of sugar

Energy drinks can have up to 25 grams of sugar or 100  calories in 8 ounces of fluid

Syrup in fruit packaging may have 39 grams of sugar-

Bottled tea  and apple juice are high in sugar too-

Choose low sugar options

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Best and worst foods for belly Fat QUIZ

Here are the highlights of the Quiz

Belly fast is worse for you than fat elsewhere on your body

Fatty foods such as butter, cheese and fatty meats are not the biggest cause of belly fat. The biggest cause is overeating, and lack of exercise

Calories from alcohol are worse for belly fat than other calories-

Trans fats an move fat from other parts of your body to your belly ( not a good thing)

Green tea, blueberries and soy show promise for fighting belly fat

Fast foods can contribute to belly fat because they are high in fat, calorie dense, and large portions.

To help your waistline- you should eat a diet high in fiber ( like popcorn)

Men tend to collect more belly fat than women

Spot exercises does NOT target belly fat

Belly fat has been linked to heart disease, osteoporosis and dementia

The best plan for reducing belly fat is cutting calories and getting more physical activity

 

 

 

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Heart Healthy Foods –

use herbs instead of salt sugar and trans fats

black beans are high in folate, Magnesium and fiber which helps lower cholesterol and blood sugar

Tuna Salmon, Mackerel, Herring. have Omega three fats to reduce blood pressure and Triglycerides

Use Olive oil- instead of saturated solid fats like butter

Walnuts and almonds have fiber and unsaturated fats- they lower LDL- bad cholesterol

Oranges- are high in pectin and Potassium which helps control blood pressure

Carrots have soluble fiber which lowers cholesterol

Oatmeal- lowers LDL Cholesterol and keeps blood sugar stable

Use less white flour and more oatmeal when baking.

Cherries and blueberries have anthocyanins which protect blood vessels